Tag Archives: Fiction

Haughnt, by David C. Cassidy

david-c-cassidy-haughntIf you’re a fan of horror novels, February 7 will be one of those wait-for-the-book-store-to-open days.

Then, 2015 National IPBA Award Winner in Horror, as well as 2015 Readers Favorite Award Winner in Horror, David C. Cassidy’s next stay-up-late-to-read-novel will be released.

Having sped through Velvet Rain, Fosgate’s Game, and The Dark, I preordered Haughnt to be delivered to my Kindle app that day. If you’re a fan of Stephen King or Dean Koontz with writing as vivid and engaging as these two esteemed authors, you’ll want to read this book too. Here’s the tagline:

We’re all damned. It’s just a question of when.

And the blurb:

As his estranged father lies on his deathbed, Paul Steele is stunned by his father’s admission: Many years ago, he committed a ghastly crime and was never caught. As if this isn’t disturbing enough, his freedom was the result of a black-magic spell. As his last breath falls from his lips, he warns Paul that he should expect a visit from a mysterious stranger.

“He’ll be coming, son. A dark man. He’ll come from the shadows.”

That man is Haughnt

Here’s a link to the trailer:

Read with this warning: set some time aside. Once you start a David C. Cassidy Novel, you’ll shove everything else aside to finish it.

A review will come soon.

 

Army of Worn Soles, by Scott Bury

Army of Worn SolesIf you’re interested in historical accounts of World War II, you’ll enjoy this book. Written with a smooth prose that moves the story along you won’t be bored with unnecessary verbiage. You’ll also feel compassion for the narrator for having been caught up in a war his country of birth wasn’t fighting.

I liked how the story began with a scene that takes place later in the book that engages the reader with what will happen to the narrator. Then the next chapter the reader gets to see the narrator, a college student, struggling with his studies while supporting himself before he’s drafted into war. I eagerly read these earlier chapters so I could see how the events that are mentioned in the first chapter are unfolded.

 Although a fictional account of the author’s father-in-law actual experiences, the story reads as a thriller. But knowing the experiences the narrator is shoved into are based on fact makes the reading all the more compelling.

 I would have liked to have had a bit more emotional connection with the narrator but that desire didn’t prevent me from devouring this book.

I look forward to the continuation of this story in the book presently being written.